Handspun Susie’s Mitts

Yay! I made these a few weeks ago, from yarn I spun from that llama-fiber batt I got at the local fiber festival, but I was too busy with work to post them then. The pattern is Susie’s Reading Mitts, and it’s free! My friend Shayda brought a Susie’s-Mitt-in-progress along to the fiber festival, which is how I learned about the pattern, so it shouldn’t be surprising that it came to mind when I was spinning this yarn.

Here’s the finished yarn before I knit it up:

I named it “Under the Apple Boughs” after Fern Hill by Dylan Thomas, which is one of my all-time favorite poems. I love how rustic the yarn looks, and the splashes of color among the brown just sing spring to me. I was worried that it would come out scratchy, based on how ornery the fiber was to spin, but it’s very, very soft!

I had these mitts in mind the whole time I was spinning the yarn, but when I finished it, my “good sense” told me that I didn’t need another pair of brown mitts, since I already have one. So I started knitting it into a scarf, but after a few days of scarfage I just could’t take it anymore and ripped it out to make these like I’d wanted to all along. Good sense be damned!

The pattern is really easy, once you get your head around the hemming at the top and bottom. I whipped these up in about three days! The pattern calls for DK-weight yarn and size 5 needles, and my yarn was definitely fingering weight, so I planned some adjustments. I wished I had size 3 needles — I only had 2 and 4 — so I decided to knit the size medium on 4s even though my hands are definitely size small. But even with the smaller yarn and needles, it rapidly became clear that size medium was too big! This is partially because my hands are very diminutive, but I think it’s also because the pattern, as written, has more ease than I really wanted. (I wanted, like, no ease.) In retrospect, maybe I should have switched to 2s and continued knitting the medium — since these are a little loosely knit — but what I ended up doing was staying on 4s and knitting the small. Which came out just right!

Yay, spring flowers! In just a day or two I’ll be back with some pictures of a new pair of socks — this is what happens when you get behind in posting!

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5 thoughts on “Handspun Susie’s Mitts

  1. I also found these to knit up a little large when I made them so I knit them smaller than I usually would & they came out just right! Everyone who sees these gloves loves them. Your yarn makes them look even more awesome, especially the little green tips seen in the top picture!

  2. they look just gorgeous! I love that pattern and have it queued on ravelry, but I must say, of all the knitted up versions I’ve seen, yours are the loveliest! That handspun really de-princesses the pattern and makes it very very funky! Love them!
    It’s freezing here and I had to borrow some mitts from my partner today (strange seeing that I’m the knitter!) so you have just inspired me to get cracking and give this pattern a try!

    • thanks so much! you’re right that the pattern does suffer from some princess-ness, especially in the fluffy white yarn that appears in the pattern itself. i hope you enjoy knitting them; they’re a breeze!

  3. Lovely! Actually knitting something with handspun yarn is totally amazing. I recently picked up spinning again (this time with a bottom-whorl spindle, which seems to suit me better) and have been somehow making a rather fine yarn, so I think I’m going to have to figure out plying next to get something useable out of it. Maybe I’ll save that step for when I’m in California (soon!) and have access to my wheel again

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